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Pirate Bay Opens New Channels for Blockade Runners

Pirate Bay Opens New Channels for Blockade Runners

Today in international tech news: As the list of countries blocking The Pirate Bay grows, the website has registered hundreds of IP addresses in preparation for what one website calls an "extended game of whac-a-mole." Also: A Japanese company releases a smartphone that can measure radiation, and Chinese PC maker Lenovo eyes potential Brazilian acquisitions.

By David Vranicar
05/29/12 10:36 AM PT

File-sharing website The Pirate Bay has added new IP addresses that will allow users to circumvent the swelling list of blocks put up against it, according to Torrent Freak.

The Pirate Bay is prepared for "an extended game of whac-a-mole," with hundreds of IP addresses in its backpocket, according to the article.

In recent weeks, courts in the UK and the Netherlands have ordered Internet service providers to block The Pirate Bay, which has long been a leading resource for file-sharers. The Pirate Bay, for its part, is gearing up.

The site has already set up a new IP address designed to make it easier for people to set up Pirate Bay-specific proxy sites. BREIN, a Dutch anti-piracy group, successfully sought a court order to block the new IP, but as The Pirate Bay has others ready to go, it could become a litigious, expensive and seemingly never-ending game of cat and mouse.

Japanese Phone to Measure Radiation

Softbank, a Japanese mobile carrier, announced the July release of a smartphone that will be able to measure radiation, according to Tech In Asia.

Last year's earthquake and ensuing nuclear scare has left a mark on the country, Softbank CEO Masayoshi Son said. He often gets messages from Twitter followers who want radiation gauges -- Geiger counters -- to be available in mobile devices.

Hence, the new phone, which will display users' real-time position and radiation exposure.

Lenovo to Build With BRICs

Chinese PC maker Lenovo is eying acquisitions in Brazil to boost its market share in emerging markets, according to Market Watch.

Lenovo, which is already showing robust growth, is currently the world's No. 2 PC maker behind HP. The two companies, however, are moving in opposite directions. HP recently announced that it will cut 27,000 jobs, while Lenovo is looking to establish a manufacturing base in Brazil, which is emerging as one of the world's fastest-growing.

Lenovo reportedly has a 30 percent market share in its native China and is now trying to expand into markets like Brazil, India, Indonesia and Mexico. Lenovo's efforts in India are already paying off, as it is recently became the nation's top PC maker.

Renesas Shares Continue Dive

Stocks for Japanese automotive microchip maker Renesas continued to fall Monday, dropping in value as much as 25 percent, according to BusinessWeek.

Last week the company announced that it could cut as many as 14,000 jobs in its quest to gets its books straight. More bad news came Monday, when the company said that it would outsource production of its high-end chips to a Taiwanese firm.

Panasonic Stocks Rise

Shares of Japanese TV maker Panasonic rose Tuesday after the company announced that it is considering cutting jobs and restructuring operations, according to Bloomberg.

The company's stock was up 3.3 percent during morning trading despite an overall drop on the Nikkei.

The uptick, however preliminary, is a welcome sign for Panasonic. Last fiscal year the company nixed 36,000 jobs, and earlier this month its stock fell to a 34-year low.

Cyberattacks Spreads Through Middle East

Malware designed to collect sensitive data has been found throughout the Middle East, according to the BBC.

Kaspersky, Russian security firm, is quoted saying the malware, called "Flame," has been operating for nearly two years.

Flame is believed to be one of the most complex cyberattacks ever discovered, and while it does not cause physical damage, it is nonetheless able to collect massive amounts of data, according to the BBC.

The complexity of Flame -- as well as the fact that it doesn't steal money or perform typical "hacking" functions -- suggests that it is government-backed, according to an expert cited by the BBC.

Iran, Israel, Syria, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Lebanon and Sudan are among the countries believed to have already been affected by Flame.


Tech Trek is a blog that looks at tech news from around the world. David Vranicar is a freelance journalist currently living in the Netherlands. His ECT News Network archive, with links to articles and podcasts, is available here. You can email him at david.vranicar@newsroom.ectnews.com



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