B2B Marketers » Reach Pre-Qualified IT Decision Makers with a Custom Lead Gen Program » Get Details
Welcome Guest | Sign In
TechNewsWorld.com
Rakuten Super Logistics

Philips Smart Hub Embraces Siri, HomeKit

By Quinten Plummer
Oct 7, 2015 11:59 AM PT
philips-hue-bridge-siri-homekit

Philips on Monday unveiled Hue Bridge 2.0., which integrates the company's smart home products and iOS's HomeKit, giving users the ability to dictate to smart things from a Siri-enabled smartphone.

Replacing its round predecessor, the square Hue Bridge 2.0 is compatible with Philips' legacy smart lights and controls. The hub will support new smart products from Philips for the foreseeable future.

It's a mutually beneficial relationship: HomeKit can reach Hue lamps and lights, while homes already kitted out with Philips' smart lighting gain the ability to automate their Internet of Things devices via iOS.

The Hue Bridge 2.0 supports connections to up to 50 smart things and is compatible with more than 450 apps.

Consumers can pick up the Hue Bridge 2.0 by itself for US$59, or they can purchase the hub in a $199 starter kit, which includes three Hue lights.

Hey, Siri

Apple's digital assistant, Siri, introduces a new dynamic into Philips' smart home ecosystem.

With Siri and its connection to HomeKit, users can activate or deactivate custom lighting schemes. For example, users can direct Siri to turn on lights along the path to a bathroom or go full power with the lighting in a home office.

With the help of the Hue app, users also can call on Siri to control their lighting remotely. The lights can be linked to the Web, newsfeeds and email inboxes.

In the Way of IoT

Philips is one party in a growing list of IoT and smart home players. Despite the efforts of Philips and the likes of Google and Apple, the market for smart things is far from mature.

Among the biggest barriers to the smart home movement are "ease of use and compelling value," said Charles King, principal analyst for Pund-IT.

"The first one is fairly straightforward, but the second can be harder to find," he told TechNewsWorld. "Suffice it to say that there are lots of solutions out there that developers considered smart, which were, in retrospect, pretty dumb."

Another issue is reliability and the perception thereof, said Matt Swatsky, director of product management at Lutron Electronics.

"The things have to work," he told TechNewsWorld. "You don't want to have to reboot your lighting. So we think those three things are super important."

There's also the hurt from the hype.

"The other thing standing in the way of smart home tech," said King, "is gun-shyness among consumers who have been burned numerous times by next-big-thing gizmos that turned out to be total duds."


Quinten Plummer is a longtime technology reporter and an avid PC gamer who explored local news for a few years, covering law enforcement and government beats, before returning to writing about things run by ones and zeros and the people who make them. If it pushes pixels or improves lives, he wants to learn all he can about it.


How do you feel about the latest wave of automation fueled by tech advances?
It's happening much too quickly, and too many jobs are at stake.
Automation means progress -- it's inevitable.
It depends on the quality of the systems and how they're used.
Automation fosters ignorance by taking over too many human tasks.
Automation frees people from boring, mind-numbing jobs.