Windows 10 Is About to Get More Secure, Easier to Use

Microsoft is poised to roll out its Windows 10 Anniversary Update on Tuesday.

The free update includes two security innovations for individual customers: Windows Hello for apps and websites; and Windows Defender.

Enterprises will get Windows Defender Advanced Threat Protection, which detects, investigates and responds to advanced malicious attacks on networks; and Windows Information Protection, or WIP, previously known as “enterprise data protection.”

Smooth Operator

Microsoft “has done a very creditable and admirable job of paying attention to security — secure by design, secure by default, secure in implementation, and secure in storage,” remarked Laura DiDio, a research director at Strategy Analytics.

“Now, they’re making it much more usable,” she told TechNewsWorld.

The Anniversary Update extends the Windows Hello biometric authentication feature in the browser using FIDO, and enables password-free access to apps such as Dropbox.

The Anniversary Update offers smartphone syncing using the Cortana apps on iOS, Android and Windows 10 Mobile.

Something for Everyone

Windows Ink, which lets users perform a number of tasks with a digital pen, is included in the update. Key apps have Ink-specific features.

With the update, the Cortana personal digital assistant appears above the lockscreen, so it can be used without having to unlock the device.

The Microsoft Edge browser includes more power-saving improvements; various Edge Extensions such as Pinterest’s “Pin It” button and AdBlock; and improved visual presentation of Web pages in high contrast mode. The update also streamlines completion of online forms.

Gamers will be able to stay connected with friends on Xbox Live and enjoy more games across their devices with the Anniversary Update. They’ll be able to use Cortana commands on Xbox One, and be able to select any supported language regardless of their location.

Finally, the Anniversary Update will simplify PC deployment, so teachers can set up devices without requiring dedicated IT support. Schools with IT support can set up shared devices in bulk, rapidly using the updated Windows Imaging and Configuration Designer tool.

Richard Adhikari has written about high-tech for leading industry publications since the 1990s and wonders where it's all leading to. Will implanted RFID chips in humans be the Mark of the Beast? Will nanotech solve our coming food crisis? Does Sturgeon's Law still hold true? You can connect with Richard on Google+.

5 Comments

  • It is true that Microsoft 10 is really fast & easy. Though it is pretty smart from other windows with its numerous application, but it would be interesting to watch how successful it is going to be in the long run.

      • I think it’s a tough sell any more for Microsoft to actually make money from Windows. Most of the operating systems are upgraded for free for a period of time the device is supported. Typically 5 years or so. Google Chrome OS, IOS, Android, OS X are all providing free upgrades. I just don’t see Microsoft being able to sell a Windows 10 upgrade to many for $119 or even $50. Especially when Windows 10 has become a marketing tool for Microsoft. I think most users would feel if your going to turn Windows into a Microsoft billboard then supply the OS for free. I don’t like paying for something then also have to put up with trying to sell me more stuff.

  • Windows is not really more secure. It’s the Defender app that is attempting to make Windows more secure. Windows itself if it was more secure wouldn’t need a built in security app. Windows people who are honest know this and take steps to protect their devices and themselves. But to say Windows is more secure is flat out a lie. I’ve heard this each time a new Windows is released about how much more secure it is. It will not ever be secure as long as it is running on most PC’s in the world. It will constantly be attacked and dissected for security flaws. This is why Defender was created in the first place to defend a troubled OS being attacked by so much.

  • "Microsoft "has done a very creditable and admirable job of paying attention to security — secure by design, secure by default, secure in implementation, and secure in storage," remarked Laura DiDio, a research director at Strategy Analytics."

    …yup…that’s why they’ve been well known for making the least secure OS in the world for decades

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