Samsung First To Build DDR3 Memory Chip

Samsung Electronics stayed a bit ahead of the curve with its announcementyesterday that it has developed the first working DDR3 DRAM (dynamic randomaccess memory) device.

The 512 MB DDR3 (double data rate 3) can process dataat 1,066 mbps, which Samsung equated with 8,000 newspaper pages a second. Itis expected to be available in early 2006.

The new memory chip also reduces the amount of battery power needed to 1.5volts from 1.8 volts. It will be used in notebook computers, desktops andservers.

First of Several

While Samsung is the first to make the announcement, it is not the onlycompany developing the faster type of memory chip.

“Several DRAM suppliers have DDR3-1066 on their roadmaps for 2006/7,including Micron and Infineon,” Nathan Brookwood, principal analyst at Insight 64, told TechNewsWorld.

“Samsung is the first to announce that it hasbuilt any chips this fast, but that’s not unusual,” he added.

“Samsung typically leadswith regard to the introduction of new memory technologies. None of theseDDR3 chips will be in production for at least 18, and more likely 24,months.”

Doubled and Doubled Again

Samsung introduced the DDR DRAM in 1998 and the DDR2 DRAM, which doubled theDDR’s speed, in 2001. The DDR3 once again doubles the processing speed ofthe current device.

“System guys always want more memory bandwidth, as long as it doesn’t costthem anything,” Brookwood said.

“Intel plans to keep ratcheting up the speedof the FSB [front-side bus] that links its CPUs with the north bridge of thechipset, where the memory controller resides,” he added.

“The FSB is now at 800, andwill advance to 1066 next year. Ideally, you want the DRAM and FSB to run atthe same speed, or at least multiples of the same speed.”

According to IDC, DDR3 DRAMs will have captured 65 percent of the market by2009.

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